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Statewide Rent Control In Oregon

Rent control in Oregon 

Oregon recently became the first state in the nation to implement universal rent control in an effort to provide relief to rent-burdened households where over 30% of income is spent on rent.

 

Statewide rent control and tenant protections

Senate Bill 608 prohibits landlords from terminating month-to-month leases without cause after 12 months of occupancy and limits rent hikes to once per year. {Source: marketwatch.com}

Oregon Governor, Kate Brown, stated that this will not be the state’s only step towards addressing affordable housing:

“This legislation will provide some immediate relief to Oregonians struggling to keep up with rising rents and a tight rental market,” Brown said in a statement. “But it does not work alone. It will take much more to ensure that every Oregonian, in communities large and small, has access to housing choices that allow them and their families to thrive.”  {Source: housingwire.com}

Oregon’s law has limitations—rent protections can only be applied to units which are at least 15 years old, and renters are not eligible until they have lived in their apartments for a year. But what’s unique about Oregon’s rules is that they will be mandatory across the state. Even in the handful of states that currently allow rent control, it is not always utilized or applicable statewide. {Source: curbed.com}

 

Eviction and rent protections

As outlined in The Oregonian, this new law also contains additional eviction protection measure and other rent-related restrictions:
  • The rent increase restrictions exempt new construction for 15 years, and landlords may raise rent without any cap if renters leave of their own accord. Subsidized rent also is exempt.
  • The bill also requires most landlords to cite a cause, such as failure to pay rent or other lease violation, when evicting renters after the first year of tenancy.
  • Some “landlord-based” for-cause evictions are allowed, including the landlord moving in or a major renovation. In those cases, landlords are required to provide 90 days’ notice and pay one month’s rent to the tenant, though landlords with four or fewer units would be exempt from the payment.

 

 

Get In Touch

If you’re a Central Oregon rental property owner with questions about this new statewide law, or if you’re considering selling your property and would like a home valuation, get in touch with one of our local real estate professionals via the form below:

 

 

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About Keeley Mannila

As the co-founder and owner of Fred Real Estate Group, Keeley is the driving force behind company culture, branding, and creative marketing strategy.

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